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Saturday, August 21, 2010

University of Texas Longhorns Football Uniform and Team History


University of Texas Longhorns

1. This document was created by Scott Sillcox to provide information about:
- the uniform images depicted in poster shown above
- the particular players whose uniforms are shown in the poster
- the history of Texas football
- the University of Texas’ football stadium
- the University of Texas' football team in general

If you would like to read an even more detailed version of this document in pdf form with approximately 30 accompanying images, please visit:
www.mapleleafproductions.com/downloads/TexasFootballUniformProject.pdf

2. Please note that all of the actual original, one-of-a-kind artwork of the University of Texas football uniforms as seen in the poster above are actually available for sale. These watercolor paintings are truly beautiful, original watercolor paintings, and there are only 13 of them so please act quickly if you would like to buy one. These would make a wonderfully memorable, beautiful and completely unique gift for someone who loves Texas football.

If you would like more information about this great artwork including the three ways you could purchase each piece, please visit our Texas YouTube video at www.youtube.com/watch?v=dRr3upiGUSI or go directly to the artwork website www.heritagesportsart.com/Texas-Longhorns-c93/ where you can see and purchase the artwork.

3. General Information about the University of Texas Longhorns Football Team

The University of Texas (formally known as the University of Texas at Austin) is a doctoral/research university. Founded in 1883 and located in Austin, Texas, it is regarded as one of America’s ‘Public Ivy’ institutions of higher education - defined as providing an ‘Ivy League’ collegiate experience at a public school cost. The school started football 10 years later, in 1893.

The Longhorns football team plays out of Darrell K. Royal-Texas Memorial Stadium, which was built in 1924 and seats 77,809 spectators.

The University of Texas boasts an excellent tradition of football success; countless Longhorns have extended their football careers in the NFL, Arena League and the CFL. Notable Longhorns alumni include: Bobby Layne, Tommy Nobis, Jerry Sisemore, Earl Campbell, Ricky Williams and Vince Young.

4. For more information on Texas football, you may want to visit these great websites:

The official University of Texas football team site can be found at:
http://www.mackbrown-texasfootball.com/

The following website offers an excellent summary page of University of Texas football, including a summary of Conference Championships; National Championships; Bowl Games; Coaches; Selected individual player records:
http://www.nationalchamps.net/NCAA/database/texas_database.htm

For further information and a view of Darrell K. Royal-Texas Memorial Stadium:
http://football.ballparks.com/NCAA/Big12/Texas/index.htm
Note: this site is also a good resource for additional past & present NCAA stadiums.


5. Description and history of the uniforms depicted in the University of Texas poster:

A quick note about the National Rankings and Polls shown below:
If Texas was nationally ranked in "The Top 20" (or Top 10 in some years) in a particular season depicted in the poster, we show the team’s ranking. That being said, prior to 1936 there was no nationally recognized poll ranking the nation’s top teams, so you will not see any rankings prior to 1936.

From 1936 onward, we show the results of one, and then two, end-of-season polls annually ranking the Top 20 (or Top 10) college football teams. There have been various other polls over the years, but we have chosen to show the results of two polls.
1. The Associated Press (AP) Poll began in 1936 and is a poll of sportswriters. It continues to this day.
2. The United Press International (UP) Poll began in 1950 and is a poll of coaches. By 1993 it had became known as the USA Today/CNN poll, and by 1997 the USA Today/ESPN poll.



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1896
This painting honors the 1896 University of Texas football team and their 4th overall season. Coached by Harry Orman "Jake" Robinson, the only coach to have beaten Texas in Texas' first 3 seasons of competition (while he was coach at Missouri) and co-captained by Julius House and James Jones, the 1896 team went 4-2-1.


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1914
This painting honors the 1914 University of Texas football team. Coached by Dave Allerdice and captained by Lineman Louis Jordan, the 1914 team went undefeated at
8-0.


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1923
This painting honors the 1923 University of Texas football team. Coached by E.J. Stewart and co-captained by Ed Bluestein and Lane Tynes, the 1923 team went undefeated at 8-0-1, with a memorable 16-0 victory over Vanderbilt on October 20th, 1923.


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1934
This painting honors the 1934 University of Texas football team. Coached by Jack Chevigny and co-captained by Charles Coates and "Bullet" Bohn Hilliard, the 1934 team went 7-2-1, finishing 2nd in the Southwest Conference.


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1947
This painting honors the 1947 University of Texas football team and #22, worn by Robert "Bobby" Layne (who wore #41 earlier in his career). Coached by Blair Cherry and co-captained by Max Baumgardner and Raymond Jones, the 1947 team went 10-1, finishing 2nd in the Southwest Conference.

The 1947 team played Alabama in the Sugar Bowl and won 27-7. Here is how the team ranked in the AP (Associated Press) poll for that season:

AP Rank Team
1 Notre Dame
2 Michigan
3 SMU
4 Penn State
5 Texas
6 Alabama
7 Pennsylvania
8 USC
9 North Carolina
10 Georgia Tech
11 Army
12 Kansas
13 Mississippi
14 William & Mary
15 California
16 Oklahoma
17 North Carolina State
18 Rice
19 Duke
20 Columbia

Bobby Layne, also known as the "Gadabout Gladiator", was a Quarterback for the University of Texas. In the 1945 Cotton Bowl, he was involved in every point scored in a 40-27 victory against Missouri and was named to the All-Southwest Conference team 4 straight years (1944-47). He was named All-American in both 1946 and 1947 and finished 8th in Heisman Trophy balloting in 1946 and 6th in 1947. He was named the ‘Outstanding Back’ in the 1947 Sugar Bowl - with Texas’ 27-7 victory over Alabama. Following his career at the University of Texas, Bobby played for the Chicago Bears, New York Bulldogs, Detroit Lions and Pittsburgh Steelers. He was elected to 5 Pro Bowls during his NFL career and was enshrined in the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1967 and the College Football Hall of Fame in 1968.

He is a member of the University of Texas Longhorn Hall of Honor.

He was elected to the College Football Hall of Fame in 1968.

He went on to the NFL where he played for 15 terrific seasons.

He was elected to the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1967.

Here is what our friends at Wikipedia have to say about Bobby Layne.


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1959
This painting honors the 1959 University of Texas football team and #81, worn by Maurice Doke. Coached by Longhorns icon Darrell Royal and co-captained by Don Allen and Monte Lee, the 1959 team went 9-2, tying for 1st in the Southwest Conference.

The 1959 team played #1 ranked Syracuse in the Cotton Bowl and lost 23-14. Here is how the team ranked in the UP (United Press) and AP (Associated Press) polls for that season:

UP Rank AP Rank Team
1 1 Syracuse
2 2 Mississippi
3 3 LSU
4 4 Texas
5 5 Georgia
6 6 Wisconsin
8 7 TCU
7 8 Washington
9 9 Arkansas
13 10 Alabama
11 11 Clemson
10 12 Penn State
12 13 Illinois
13 14 USC
17 15 Oklahoma
16 Wyoming
18 17 Notre Dame
20 18 Missouri
20 19 Florida
19 20 Pittsburgh
15 Auburn
16 Michigan State

Maurice Doke was a Guard for the University of Texas. In the 1959 season, he would not only be named All-American, but would also be one of 8 national winners of an Earl Blaik Fellowship. Along with teammates Jack Collins (Halfback), Rene Ramirez (Halfback) and Monte Lee (End), Maurice would be named to the 1959 All-Southwest Conference team.


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1963
This painting honors the 1963 University of Texas football team and #60, worn by Thomas "Tommy" Nobis. Coached by Longhorns icon Darrell Royal and tri-captained by Scott Appleton, Tommy Ford and David McWilliams, the 1963 team went an undefeated 11-0, winning the school’s first National Championship.

The 1963 team capped off their championship season by beating #2 ranked Navy 28-6 in the Cotton Bowl. Here is how the team ranked in the UP (United Press) and AP (Associated Press) polls for that season:

UP Rank
AP Rank Team
1 1 Texas
2 2 Navy
4 3 Illinois
3 4 Pittsburgh
6 5 Auburn
5 6 Nebraska
7 7 Mississippi
9 8 Alabama
10 9 Michigan State
8 10 Oklahoma

Tommy Nobis was an ‘iron man’ football star for the University of Texas - having played Linebacker on defense and Guard on offense. In the 1963 championship season, he played an integral part in shutting down Heisman-winner Roger Staubach in the Cotton Bowl, helping Texas to a 28-6 victory over Navy. In the 1964 Orange Bowl, he was instrumental in preserving a 21-17 lead against Alabama’s offense, led by Quarterback Joe Namath. During his Longhorn career, Tommy was named All-American twice and three times to the All-Southwest Conference team. In 1965, he was the recipient of both the Outland Trophy - given to the nation’s outstanding interior Lineman and the Maxwell Award - honoring the nation’s outstanding college football player. He finished 7th in Heisman Trophy balloting that season. Following his career at the University of Texas, Tommy played his entire NFL career for the Atlanta Falcons.

He is a member of the University of Texas Longhorn Hall of Honor.

He was elected to the College Football Hall of Fame in 1981.

He was recognized as the 14th best College Football Player of all time by the College Football News in their 2000-ish ranking.

He went on to the NFL where he played for 11 seasons.

Here is what our friends at Wikipedia have to say about Tommy Nobis.


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1969
This painting honors the 1969 University of Texas football team and #16, worn by James Street. Coached by Longhorns icon Darrell Royal and tri-captained by Street, Glen Halsell and Ted Koy, the 1969 team went an undefeated 11-0, winning the school’s second National Championship.

In 1969, Texas capped off their championship season by beating Notre Dame 21-17 in the Cotton Bowl. Here is how the team ranked in the UP (United Press) and AP (Associated Press) polls for that season:

UP Rank
AP Rank Team
1 1 Texas
2 2 Penn State
4 3 USC
5 4 Ohio State
9 5 Notre Dame
6 6 Missouri
3 7 Arkansas
13 8 Mississippi
8 9 Michigan
7 10 LSU
12 11 Nebraska
16 12 Houston
10 13 UCLA
17 14 Florida
11 15 Tennessee
16 Colorado
18 17 West Virginia
18 18 Purdue
14 19 Stanford
15 20 Auburn
18 San Diego State

James Street was a Quarterback for the University of Texas - leading the Longhorn offense for his final two years. As a senior, he would help bring the school its second National Championship. During his Longhorn career, James was also a member of the varsity baseball team, tossing two no-hitters and leading Texas to two Southwest Conference titles. His son Huston would follow in his footsteps and would also become a member of the Texas Longhorns’ baseball team (2002-04).

James Street is a member of the University of Texas Longhorn Hall of Honor.

Here is what our friends at Wikipedia have to say about James Street.


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1970
This painting honors the 1970 University of Texas football team and #62, worn by Jerry Sisemore. Coached by Longhorns icon Darrell Royal and co-captained by Scott Henderson, Steve Worster, Bobby Wuensch and Bill Zapalac, the 1970 team went 10-1, winning the school’s third National Championship.

In a season of disputed National Champions, Texas was the 1970 UPI National Champion but lost their only game of the year to Notre Dame in the season ending Cotton Bowl 24-11. Here is how the team ranked in the UP (United Press) and AP (Associated Press) polls for that season:

UP Rank *before Bowl Games
AP Rank Team
3 1 Nebraska
5 2 Notre Dame
1 3 Texas
4 4 Tennessee
2 5 Ohio State
8 6 Arizona State
6 7 LSU
10 8 Stanford
7 9 Michigan
9 10 Auburn
12 11 Arkansas
17 12 Toledo
17 13 Georgia Tech
13 14 Dartmouth
19 15 USC
16 Air Force
17 Tulane
19 18 Penn State
13 19 Houston
20 Mississippi
15 20 Oklahoma

Jerry Sisemore was a Tackle for the University of Texas and was part of a team that ran an unbeaten streak to 31 games. During his Longhorn career, he was twice voted
All-American and named to the All-Southwest Conference team. In 1972, his senior year, Jerry helped Texas win its 3rd consecutive Southwest Conference title and reach its 3rd straight Cotton Bowl appearance. Following his career at the University of Texas, Jerry played his entire NFL career for the Philadelphia Eagles - being elected to three Pro Bowls.

He is a member of the University of Texas Longhorn Hall of Honor.

He was elected to the College Football Hall of Fame in 2002.

He was recognized as the 138th best College Football Player of all time by the College Football News in their 2000-ish ranking.

He went on to the NFL where he played for 12 seasons.

Here is what our friends at Wikipedia have to say about Jerry Sisemore.


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1977
This painting honors the 1977 University of Texas football team and #20, worn by Earl Campbell. Coached by Fred Akers and co-captained by Campbell, Morgan Copeland, George James and Brad Shearer, the 1977 team went 11-1, finishing 1st in the Southwest Conference.

The 1977 team played Notre Dame in the Cotton Bowl and lost 38-10. Here is how the team ranked in the UP (United Press) and AP (Associated Press) polls for that season:

UP Rank
AP Rank Team
1 1 Notre Dame
2 2 Alabama
3 3 Arkansas
5 4 Texas
4 5 Penn State
*On Probation 6 Kentucky
6 7 Oklahoma
7 8 Pittsburgh
8 9 Michigan
9 10 Washington
12 11 Ohio State
10 12 Nebraska
12 13 USC
11 14 Florida State
15 15 Stanford
19 16 San Diego State
14 17 North Carolina
18 18 Arizona State
19 Clemson
16 20 BYU
16 North Texas
19 North Carolina State

Earl Campbell, also known as the "Tyler Rose", was a Halfback for the University of Texas. His Longhorn playing days included 21 games where he rushed for 100+ yards, three over 200 and was named All-American twice. In 1977, he not only led the nation in rushing and scoring, but also won the Heisman Trophy - awarded to the outstanding intercollegiate football player in the United States. Following his career at the University of Texas, Earl played the majority of his NFL career for the Houston Oilers, before closing it out with the New Orleans Saints. His many NFL accomplishments included 3 MVP Awards, 3 Offensive Player-of-the-Year Awards and enshrinement into the Pro Football Hall of Fame. His #20 at the University of Texas and #34 with the Oilers were both retired.

He is a member of the University of Texas Longhorn Hall of Honor.

He was elected to the College Football Hall of Fame in 1990.

He was recognized as the 35th best College Football Player of all time by the College Football News in their 2000-ish ranking.

He went on to the NFL where he played for 8 seasons.

He was elected to the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1991.

Here is what our friends at Wikipedia have to say about Earl Campbell.

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1983
This painting honors the 1983 University of Texas football team and #2, worn by Jerry Gray. Coached by Fred Akers and co-captained by Doug Dawson, Eric Holle, Mark Lang, Jeff Leiding, Mike Ruether and Ed Williams, the 1983 team went 11-1, finishing 1st in the Soutwest Conference.

The 1983 team played Georgia in the Cotton Bowl and lost 10-9. Here is how the team ranked in the UP (United Press) and AP (Associated Press) polls for that season:

UP Rank
AP Rank Team
1 1 Miami
2 2 Nebraska
3 3 Auburn
4 4 Georgia
5 5 Texas
6 6 Florida
7 7 BYU
9 8 Michigan
8 9 Ohio State
10 10 Illinois
*On Probation 11 Clemson
11 12 SMU
15 13 Air Force
14 14 Iowa
12 15 Alabama
16 16 West Virginia
13 17 UCLA
19 18 Pittsburgh
20 19 Boston College
20 East Carolina
17 Penn State
18 Oklahoma State

Jerry Gray was a Safety for the University of Texas - and was one of six All-American Defensive Backs to have played for the Longhorns. In an infamous 1984 game against the Auburn Tigers, Gray ran down Tailback Bo Jackson, known for his tremendous speed, and caught him from behind. The aftermath left Jackson with a separated shoulder and dashed any potential Heisman Trophy hopes that season. Following his career at the University of Texas, Jerry played for the Los Angeles Rams and Houston Oilers, before closing out his NFL career with the Tampa Bay Buccaneers. During his professional playing days, Jerry was known for being a very hard-hitter and was selected to 4 Pro Bowls - taking home MVP honors in the 1989 game, after recording 7 tackles and returning an interception 51 yards for a touchdown. Jerry has also served as a coach, as a Defensive Coordinator for the Buffalo Bills and as Secondary/Cornerbacks coach for the Washington Redskins.

He is a member of the University of Texas Longhorn Hall of Honor.

He went on to the NFL where he played for 9 seasons.

Here is what our friends at Wikipedia have to say about Jerry Gray.


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1998
This painting honors the 1998 University of Texas football team and #34, worn by Errick "Ricky" Williams. Coached by Mack Brown and co-captained by Williams, Aaron Humphrey, Wayne McGarity and Dusty Renfro, the 1998 team went 9-3.

The 1998 team played Mississippi State in the Cotton Bowl and won 38-11. Here is how the team ranked in the USA Today/ESPN and AP (Associated Press) polls for that season:

USA Today / ESPN Rank
AP Rank Team
1 1 Tennessee
2 2 Ohio State
3 3 Florida State
4 4 Arizona
6 5 Florida
5 6 Wisconsin
7 7 Tulane
8 8 UCLA
11 9 Georgia Tech
9 10 Kansas State
13 11 Texas A&M
12 12 Michigan
10 13 Air Force
14 14 Georgia
16 15 Texas
17 16 Arkansas
15 17 Penn State
18 18 Virginia
20 19 Nebraska
21 20 Miami

Ricky Williams, also known as the "Texas Tornado", was a Running Back for the University of Texas. In 1998, Williams became just the second Longhorn (RB Earl Campbell, 1977) to win the Heisman Trophy - awarded to the outstanding intercollegiate football player in the United States. His spectacular collegiate football career also included such notable achievements as:
* 1998 Maxwell Award winner - as the nation’s outstanding college football player
* 1998 Walter Camp Player-of-the Year
* 1998 Associated Press Player-of-the-Year
* 1998 Sporting News Player-of-the-Year
* 1998 Sullivan Award finalist
* two-time ‘consensus’ All-American
* two-time Big 12 Offensive Player-of-the-Year
* three-time first-team All-Big 12 selection
* first ever two-time Doak Walker Award winner

Upon completing his Longhorn career, he would hold or share 21 NCAA and 46 University of Texas all-time records including: career all-purpose yards, career 200-yard games and career yards per carry, among others. Following his career at the University of Texas, Ricky’s professional football career was severely impeded by multiple suspensions & hiatuses stemming from off-field issues. He played for the New Orleans Saints and Miami Dolphins prior to sitting out the 2004 season. He returned to the Miami Dolphins in 2005 before being forced to serve a 1-year suspension in 2006. Ricky spent that 2006 season playing with the Toronto Argonauts in the Canadian Football League.

He was recognized as the 22nd best College Football Player of all time by the College Football News in their 2000-ish ranking.

A summary of his NFL career can be found here.

Here is what our friends at Wikipedia have to say about Ricky Williams.


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2005
This painting honors the 2005 University of Texas football team and #10, worn by Vincent "Vince" Young. Coached by Mack Brown and co-captained by Young, Ahmard Hall, David Thomas and Rodrique Wright, the 2005 team went 13-0, winning the National Championship.

Texas capped off their undefeated season by beating favored and two-time defending national champ USC 41-38 in the Rose Bowl. Here is how the team ranked in the USA Today/ESPN and AP (Associated Press) polls for that season:

USA Today / ESPN Rank
AP Rank Team
1 1 Texas
2 2 USC
3 3 Penn State
4 4 Ohio State
6 5 West Virginia
5 6 LSU
7 7 Virginia Tech
8 8 Alabama
11 9 Notre Dame
10 10 Georgia
9 11 TCU
16 12 Florida
12 13 Oregon
14 14 Auburn
15 15 Wisconsin
13 16 UCLA
18 17 Miami
17 18 Boston College
20 19 Louisville
19 20 Texas Tech

Vince Young, also known as "VY", was a Quarterback for the University of Texas. In 2005, as a Junior, Vince was one of three finalists for the Heisman Trophy - pitted against two USC Trojans (2004 winner QB Matt Leinart and RB Reggie Bush). He would ultimately beat Leinart in the voting, but would finish second to Bush. He was, however, named the 2005 best college football player by College Football News. On January 4, 2006, in a much heralded match-up of the three 2005 Heisman finalists, Vince’s Longhorns defeated the Trojans 41-38 to win the Rose Bowl. Young’s incredible performance included: completing 75% of his passes for 267 yards, rushing for another 200 yards on 19 attempts, scoring 3 rushing touchdowns and taking home game MVP honors. Following his career at the University of Texas, Vince was drafted #3 overall by the Tennessee Titans in the 2006 draft. He was named the Offensive Rookie-of-the-Year and was selected to the Pro Bowl.

A summary of his NFL career can be found here.

Here is what our friends at Wikipedia have to say about Vince Young.

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Celebrate the University of Texas Longhorns football uniform history by owning a piece of history:

If you love the University of Texas and the history of Texas Longhorns football, you might really love to own an original piece of artwork celebrating the team's historic uniforms as seen in the poster at the top of this blog - you can actually own one of those original pieces of art! There are only 13 pieces of original art available for sale, and when these 13 are sold, that's it, they're all sold out.

These original watercolor paintings would make a great gift (birthday gift, anniversary gift, retirement gift, Christmas gift, etc.) for someone you love or even a great gift for yourself (one of these framed pieces would look fantastic in your home or office). Each piece can be bought one of three ways:
1. As unframed art that you could have framed or mounted yourself (the one on the left)
2. Framed in our "Classic" framed version (the middle version)
3. Framed in our "Deluxe" framed version (the version on the right)



If you would like more information about this great artwork including the three ways you could purchase each piece, please visit our University of Texas YouTube video at www.youtube.com/watch?v=dRr3upiGUSI or go directly to the artwork website www.heritagesportsart.com/Texas-Longhorns-c93/ where you can see and purchase the artwork.

And if someone you know loves the history of sports uniforms (but maybe another team) and loves great art, please let them know that we have over 1500 pieces of great original artwork for sale at www.heritagesportsart.com (all NFL teams, all MLB teams, all NHL teams, all CFL teams, select NCAA football teams) or check out each team's video at the Heritage Sports Art YouTube Channel www.youtube.com/user/ssillcox

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This blog was written by Scott Sillcox and was last updated August 21, 2010. I have tried to ensure the accuracy of the information, but I am human and can make mistakes. If you believe I have made a mistake, please let me know by email at ssillcox@rogers.com !

3 comments:

  1. This comment has been removed by the author.

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    Replies
    1. Excellent research and artwork!
      However, you overlooked the most unique Longhorn football uniform of all time. In the 1950s Coach Ed Price had the Longhorns dressed in orange helmets and orange pants, both with a white stripe. They were great looking uniforms that presented a clean look. Coach Price was ahead of his time when it came to classy looking uniforms.

      Delete
  2. This is very nice event, we are also provide online education and we have also senior level professors see Pacific Cambria University Website get enroll first and take discount plus degree as well.

    ReplyDelete